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with these folks day in and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensu
'm never going to complain to jerry brown, what he to happen in the state legislature, because i used the first year and a half to insulate myself from all of that, emotionally as well as programmatically to say i'm not going to let the state hurt our city or the federal government. we've got to innovate our way out of this economic dole drum and we are doing so with inviting people here. those of you who take this word challenge, and really can really seriously bring that to fore with your best ideas, this is what i'm doing with all these technology companies. i'm not satisfied with just hosting a new company in the city, i want to know what they're doing, who's working there, where they're coming from, what they plan for the five or 10 years and how we can help them grow. as they're growing their jobs i want to know technologically how we can help. that's why i love going to accelerators, to find out what are the next five years that we're incubating so when it comes like what happened last week with dr. yam naka working at gladstone institute at mission bay becomes one of the newes
to be a disagreement about the use of switch backs and maybe you can talk from your point of view why you use them and let's start with that. >> okay. i think in terms of knowing -- we don't get up in the morning and say we have a goal to switchbacks. they're service management technique or tactic to make adjustment to recover from a significant delay and for us, and this is when we talked about the grand jury report when we first were briefed on it our concern was this was a lost opportunity, a lost opportunity to talk about muni service. in other words, what are the things that cause delays? what are the things we need to be doing to improve on time performance from crew reliability? what are the specific actions? what are the specific things? that's what we wanted to have. the higher the on time performance the less runs that are missed, the less vehicles break down, there is a less of a need for switchbacks. switchbacks are a symptom to us or a tactic, not part of the problem, so when do we use them? we use them when you have a significant break down, delay in service, a delay that mig
share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears, and it's been in the newspaper so it's not a secret, but one of the things that scares me as well is the united states is not really experienced what i would call a global disaster yet. we have had disasters, i was in katrina o
don't yet know will all be on this land for all of us for years to come. thank you so much for your support. we're going to continue to need it as we go forward building. thank you. [ applause ] >> thank you, jule. i see another former library commission president and former commissioner charles. thank you for your great service as well. [ applause ] when we talk about partnerships, there is no other group that better defines partnerships for the city and support and the public-private partnership than the friends of the san francisco public library and have provided the funding for all of our furniture, the fixtures and all of the equipment. it truly owns our library in that regard. it's my pleasure to introduce of the executive director of the friends of the san francisco libraries scott. >> [ applause ] . >> thank you. it's a pleasure to be here. as luis said we had this fantastic public-private partnership for 23 branchs and now is your opportunity if you want to join 4400 other san franciscans who raised $12.7 million for other branchs we invite you to join us back at tent and
torrez to join us again on stage, joaquin will be introducing the mayor and if i can ask my fellow committee members to also join us on stage. joaquin. >> thank you very much i have to say as director the mayor's oches of neighborhood services it's refreshing to have a mayor so dedicated to couldn't and it makes my job easier when our people in the community want to feel our elected efficients make our needs and it's in physical presence and i have had the great pleasure of serving under our mayor lee who i would like to make a invite to make a few remarks in honor or of arab heritage month here in san francisco. >> thank you, thank you joaquin, thank you, welcome to our orange city hall. i want to welcome everybody here this fourthth animal america arab month of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now
. >> all in favor? >> aye. >> please be advised that the ringing and use of cell phones and pagers and similar devices are prohibited at this meeting. please be advised that the chair may order the removal in the meeting room of any person using one of these electronic devices. please be advised that a member of the public has up to three minutes to make comments on each agenda item unless a shorter period is adopted on any item. first is executive port report. >> thank you we have a great agenda and happy to see so many faces. i have a few items on the executive director report. i wanted to report a couple of milestones with respect to the brandon street project. it's going on schedule. you recall it calls for june 2013 completion date, and so that is on schedule. it is a $26 million project, so we of very fortunate to have some funds come from the 2008 clean and safe neighborhood parks bond, and you recall it's located on the embarcadero and intended to be a new 57,000 square foot public open space with raised land and interpretive elements and we were fortunate to get financ
40% of the electrical energy over traditional elevator. these elevators save energy by using a regenerative drive. when the cars are going up empty or down full of people, they generate electricity that goes back into the building grid. these elevators have energy by grouping people going to the same floor in the same cab. and the way they work is you have a shared elevator call button in the lobby. you would indicate which floor you're going to, for instance like 3, and it will direct me to elevator c. so, i'll go to an elevator with people that are going to that same floor. what's also interesting is inside the elevator floor cab there are no selection buttons because i selected my floor in the lobby. this takes some getting used to as we're all accustomed to choosing our floor inside the elevator cabs. ♪ ♪ >> another thing we saut that was a challenge for this building was the permitting process for the delivery machine to use reclaimed water in an office building. and i think that we really broke the ground for future use to be much more commonplace for utilization of
and delightful insights into what he was really like. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic.
to thank the mayor and our supervisors, and phil ginsburg for putting us on that bond. let's get prop b passed, shall we? [ applause ] so we're going to turn some dirt and we're going to start a library. thank you all for being here today. you made this happen. [ applause ] >> thank you, julie. well-done, julie. thank you. thank you. mr. mayor, will you have the honors. district supervisors, mohammed, phil, julie, come on down here and grab yourself a shovel and we're going to have a countdown. are we ready? let's have a countdown. on the count of 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1! north beach branch library! . >> are you guys ready? okay. >> roll call. commissioner. >> present. >> commissioner. >> here. >> commissioner. >> here. >> commissioner. >> here. >> item two approval of minutes for october 23, 2012 meeting with a minor correction on the first page commissioner brandon was present. >> so moved. >> all in favor. >> aye. >> number three, public comment on executive session. sue hester. >> sue hester. i didn't identify myself on there, but i have attended all of the public worksh
representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he currently oversees the intensative job readiness and works with
to be completed. a lot of hard decisions and he stood with us. phil ginsburg, rec and park director. our dpw director mohammed, the last time i saw o & m mohammed he was pushing a wheelbarrow. our department heads have stood with us. jill, karen, besides them, gary, who was at the time capital planning manager for rec and park. mindy, lenu chen, the manager for the project. michael from planning, john from the city attorney's office. michelle and mary, michelle is with the library and mary is with the friends of the library and put on this event today. our commissioners, rec and park, planning, library, who have voted unanimously. some of them more than once for this project. our board of supervisors, who stood with us. the architects, marsha and a special thanks to erin who has done so much to help us on though this project. you know? that is the city side of this public-private partnership and i have to be fair in saying that this project has lasted through the term of two supervisors, two head librarians, three mayors, and four rec and park general managers. the heart of this project, t
about a week-long event and actually constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise the
heard about the conflict between the storage and maintenance needs, and the use by thousands of travelers and of course right there with residential neighborhood, so the upper yard which is our satellite light rail storage yard historically is now recently it's been used for employee parking and that is in the red outline. we are looking at how to make that available for conversion to a transit village probably along with the bart kiss and ride roadway way to the west and that is in line with the balboa park station area plan that the board of supervisors adopted that calls for reusing that site as a transit village with affordable housing being a high priority, maybe support retail. a lot of potential benefits for example in increasing the transit rider ship and the station capacity study looked at the transportation feasibility of that, and found that it would work well from the transportation standpoint. there have been a number of other studies under way in terms of the potential land uses. i'm not going to get into that. it is a challenge for the sf mta to meet the ne
and things that can reduce water use in san francisco. can you tell us a little bit about that? she is a toilet expert, by the way. >> toilets have all different flows, but carli, you have to have a 1.6 gallon or less. -- currently. >> that is the state plumbing code minimum standard. >> that is going to save your water compared to what a lot of people still have in their bathrooms. they have 3.5 or 5 gallons. that is using a ton of water. >> the year there is a new city ordinance requirement to reduce flow flesh? >> and a lot of manufacturers are real -- are already making those toilets. right here, we have a dual-flush toilet. this toilet uses 1.6 gallons on the full flush and 0.9 on the half less. >> what happened? >> it automatically opens. this is a fancy toilet. we can get to that later. >> this is the half loss, which is how many? >> 0.9. so it is very good toilet, water-saving. and then the other kind of toilet that saves water is and 1.28 gallons a flush. >> i know when people first started selling and installing the 1.6, there were problems with it was not clear in the bow
this legislation, the planning code would not allow us to build a new hospital, right here on this site. it is our dream to have something to continue on for our future. but now, our dream is becoming a reality. i would like to bring up the one supporter, the friend, who helped us, the organization and the project, the mayor of san francisco ed lee. [ applause ] >> thank you, brend brenda. good morning, everyone, welcome to the chinese center, where the hospital has been since the late 1800s. this is history for all of us. it is history for our city. and those of you who know about that history, know that chinese hospice was built in a time when immigrants came here and faced discrimination. they faced a whole lot of barriers. they couldn't buy property. they couldn't get healthcare to people that were working in the gold mines and on the rail roads. and this is something that many generations of immigrants to come to this country have learned about, even in a wonderful city, and ininclusive city like san francisco. so it is in the backdrop that all of us have come together to support moderization
painful experience of my life he was booked on a charge of resisting arest. his attorney says police used excessive force. >> i assumed they saw the video of this incident. and they refused to file it. they said no.ziñ gillson posted this video on you tube about three weeks ago. says it's received about half a million hits. police chief declined to talk to us on camera but in a phone conversation says it video doesn't speak for itself. the post posted was edited. internal affairs determined the officer acted within policy. >> i think a picture says a thousand words. >> we showed this individual yes to don cam ran, teaching classes on the use of force. he says gillson was not resisting or trying to escape. but says domestic violence is a serious crime and had not been frisked yet for a weapon. this is what caught his eye. gillson looking over his left shoulder, lowering his arms. a possible reason for firing a taser. >> officers see someone that traces them, and next thing hands start to move. that is a pors site. red frag for officers. >> and cameron tells us in this case, he doesn't t
one of us carries on. we talked about the acronyms each one of us uses. so, we had a real-world -- a real-live exercise that validated some of the things we talk about this morning. but it was extremely beneficial to not only the u.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all o
from refreshments and drinks with us. we have so much to celebrate tonight. >> and so many honorees to celebrate and are you true partners in making san francisco the best city in america in 2012. [applause] >> our theme for tonight's celebration is "community unity" because it's because of the collective efforts of the honorees across the diverse fields that bind us together. >> as we talk about about your programs and the media brings hope what means most to the community. we're we honor your success to san francisco or your distribution to the small businesses or the community or the youth or bringing the diversity to us through intricate sound. >> whether we inspire us in the community and bringing safety and respect to the most vulnerable among us. >> we salute all of our honorees tonight that bring pride and diggity to the san francisco latino community and let's give them all a round of applause to what they bring to our city of san francisco. [applause] >> so we know that every great city needs a equally great leader and our first presenter tonight is exactly that. he recog
a great challenge in front of us. there are so many of our asian american friends, iranian friends, friends from the philippines, friends from our japanese-american community, are chinese-american community, waiting for the opportunity to come together to celebrate our diversity, but also to signal to our european friends, our latino france, we are ready to help lead this state. and helped change the conversation and not only celebrate diversity, but use diversity for our strength. that is our strength. i want to signal to you, let's come together, let's use this opportunity to make sure we can celebrate our strength throughout the state. i also want to welcome carmen chu. thank you for joining us. we can really celebrate and we can bring this state for because i know -- he does not want to be alone in san francisco suggesting change. nobody wants to be alone. all of us can contribute to a more positive outlook on life. guess what -- when we look at where we came from, when we look at the parents that brought us here, the generations before us, we learned a great lesson. we learned
merced and working between us and the national guard, exercising the evacuation of casualties under the control and observation of the department of emergency management, and these are things that we can only really understand through exercise, through training and then figure out where the gaps are and what we need to do to smooth those out. i'll also reference lan wilder if i can. she said something that was pretty revealing. prior to yesterday and getting out on the beach and seeing us, her thinking was just to ride out the disaster. now she feels like she's in a position where she can do some strategic thinking and strategic planning, which is really an obligation for all of us in charge. as captain jones said earlier this morning, we do not know what this is going to look like and it's certainly not going to look like what we anticipate. but having us understand how to react and how to interact with each other will give us a basis upon which we can go forward and move hopefully very quickly to salvage what we can in the event of a complex catastrophe. thank you. >> and admiral
enforcement here in california is in effect a war on crumbs instead of the often used phrase on drugs. how do you respond to his remarks? >> well, i think the first thing that we have to recognize is that the majority of people who are caught up in the criminal justice system and who are prosecuted for this type of offense for possession offenses and to some degree possession for sale offenses, the vast majority are indigent people and the vast majority of those indigent people are people of color. so what you have are two systems in place. you have a system where privileged white middle class people basically use drugs, college campuses, frat parties, not clubs, they use drug with impunity, they don't have to worry about being caught. then you have a system that comes down like a ton of bricks on indigent poor people and that's one of the reasons why i think this type of reform is a positive first step because if you aren't going to make drug possession illegal, at least make it a misdemeanor and not a felony. at least don't stigmatize and label an entire population of people as felons and p
of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help students, particularly low income and underserved students, move on to 4 year institutions. we serve nearly 100,000 students in san francisco and are a tremendous resource, we think, for san francisco. the last couple years the state budget cuts we faced, $53 million in the last 3 years alone, have really made it a challenge for us to keep our doors open for san fran
it for me? >> sure. basically he is saying that the terminology used in the original report is fine. i used language that what would be the traditional academic version of the language and he is okay. he doesn't feel there is a reason to make change scption he understands it's it was done accordingly and reasons why i changed the language is primarily it was the language used in the city and since was to deal with san francisco and the discussion going on at the time i wanted to keeplet language the same to that discussion and why i had the definitions the way it was and he wanted changes made that were more traditional in nature. >> are you a academic or a card carrying member of a amdemmic institution? >> no. >> thank you. >> before we take any action is there any member of the public that would like to speak on this item? seeing none public comment is closed. mr. fried in terms of here, the lafco we can make the changes? >> yes, you can or if you don't want to. >> it's up to the commission. commissioner avalos. >> i don't feel strongly about makes changes. the report was complete
happy that all of you could come out and join us, you know, on this evening. my namey. the director of the night rover challenge. i'm going to kind of be the moderator for tonight, as we go through this first-ever challenge america summit. so i've got just a few things that, you know, i wanted to do with everyone, before we get into the program. first of all, i just want to take a minute and have everyone just look around this room. in this room, we have amazing people that are corporate, nonprofit, and government, all focused on challenge driven innovation in some way or another. this is a really powerful,interf people that are gathered here to look at how competitions can drive innovation. that's what tonight is all about, is, you know, the next step in creating a real wave of innovation. my job tonight is just to give you a little bit of background on what we are, what we're tiqp)q)s that we have.roup of so just to get going with that, i want to tell you a little bit about this thing called the night rover/< challenge. this is a collaboration between the clean tech open, unoodle,
meeting, can you give us a little more information what that will look like so that we have a better sense of what it is that we're going to try to accomplish? >> barbara hale, assistant general manager for power. what i am proposing and ms. miller and i have not yet had an opportunity to discuss this more fully. i understand the commission secretaries have talked and it's a to do on our list just to talk further. what we would like to propose is to address the time line for providing service, and to give you a flavor of some of the key steps, key activities that have to occur for us to be able to go forward, and to discuss the scope, geographic scope and size of the program and customer base we would be proposing to offer service to in the first phase, both through preenrollment program and the opt out portion of the program so it's those two primary items we have at the puc on our list to discuss with you. miss miller, did you have anything to add or subtract? >> i thought we would talk about marketing and outreach and an item and providing a schedule and have the consultant come if th
to study their standard operating procedures but note the claim that others are using procedures similar to muni. the jury answers "the jury approves part of the response about contacting peers. we hope that you contact those systems that were on our list. these systems are seen by the controller as being similar to muni, and have higher reliability and passenger ratings than muni. if muni is going to strife for improvement and go for systems that do not justify a failed mentality. audit muni funds. the audit has control of the funds and working on tep. as the preferred avenue for service. the jury appreciates muni's response. next is train staff for controlled center. muni says staffing is under way for fiscal year 2013 to be completed by the end of the fiscal year and new communications expected in 2015. the jury expects muni's response and the final recommendation is monthly surveys. muni disagrees with the monthly part. they say that are conducting quarterly surveys and will conduct annual survey and perform on board passenger survey in early 2013. the results will be on t
it in and it will make us more effective. we did an exercise back in may in preparation for this and developed a pretty detailed concept of operations. we built load plan, timelines, spare parts lists, we really got into the weeds, thinking about the second and third tier effects, so i want my relief to understand that and i want him to know where that plan is so he can pull it right off the shelf if this ever happens and be ready to respond quickly instead of trying to figure this all out when we need to be getting underway. >> i'll boil mine down into just one, and that is i will pass to my relief to continue to support events like this and look for opportunities to continue to learn how we best in the military can integrate with our civilian and federal contemporaries to be prepared for an eventuality that we hope will never come, but we certainly should be prepared for. so the one thing i'm passing on is keep the momentum. >> thank you, all. one other benefit that was cited in the after action review and also was mentioned today is the chance it meet someone else from the other agency. we also h
corps. that's an area where we could use some improvement. our forces deployed to the western pacific certainly understand this, and they pass it on among themselves. the forces we deploy from southern california and the east coast that float into theater understand disaster assistance and humantarian response very well. that hasn't quite migrated itself into the institutional arena in terms of forces stationed here in the united states as it would relate to defense support to civil authorities. i think that's primarily -- this is not a primary mission for us. it's something that we do pay attention to, of course, as we deploy overseas. not necessarily forces we have here in the states. we do understand immediate response, rolling out the gate to help our neighbors in an immediate nature, but i think not so much in terms of mobilization and deploying inside our country. so, this is an area where opportunities like san francisco fleet week will allow us for, and i believe at some point really incorporate this in some internal doctrine that will benefit us in the event that this is a re
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,264 (some duplicates have been removed)